Slovenia adds water to constitution as fundamental right for all

man diving into water

Slovenia’s water belongs to all its citizens, the country’s parliament has declared in a constitutional amendment. Photograph: Alamy

Slovenia has amended its constitution to make access to drinkable water a fundamental right for all citizens and stop it being commercialised.

With 64 votes in favour and none against, the 90-seat parliament added an article to the EU country’s constitution saying “everyone has the right to drinkable water”.

The centre-right opposition Slovenian Democratic party (SDS) abstained from the vote saying the amendment was not necessary and only aimed at increasing public support.

Slovenia is a mountainous, water-rich country with more than half its territory covered by forest.

“Water resources represent a public good that is managed by the state. Water resources are primary and durably used to supply citizens with potable water and households with water and, in this sense, are not a market commodity,” the article reads.

The centre-left prime minister, Miro Cerar, had urged lawmakers to pass the bill saying the country of two million people should “protect water – the 21st century’s liquid gold – at the highest legal level”.

“Slovenian water has very good quality and, because of its value, in the future it will certainly be the target of foreign countries and international corporations’ appetites.

“As it will gradually become a more valuable commodity in the future, pressure over it will increase and we must not give in,” Cerar said.

Slovenia is the first European Union country to include the right to water in its constitution, although according to Rampedre (the online Permanent World Report on the Right to Water).

Earlier this year Slovenia also declared the world’s first green destination country by the Netherlands-based organisation Green Destinations, while its capital, Ljubljana, was made the 2016 European Green Capital.

Amnesty International said Slovenia must ensure the new law would be also applied to the 10,000-12,000 Roma people living in the country.

“Many Roma are … denied even minimum levels of access to water and sanitation,” Amnesty said in a statement.

The European Union agreed in 2014 to exclude water supply and water resources management from the rules governing the European internal market, following the first successful European Citizens’ Initiative that managed to raise more than one million signatures.

Originally published on https://www.theguardian.com/

November 23, 2016

Jaime Tanna

Jaime Tanna is an international teacher and energy therapist specialising in the healing arts. As the visionary founder and director of Energy Therapy, Jaime is an experienced Spiritual Teacher/Mentor, Reiki Master, Yoga Teacher, Sound Healer and Intuitive, and brings a wide array of different skills to the healing table. Coming from a family of pharmacists and doctors, Jaime grew up with a strong allopathic model of the world but quickly saw the limitations of that paradigm. Today, with clients and students throughout the world, Jaime specialises in personal and spiritual development, yoga and meditation, and clearing and rebalancing the human energy field inspiring clients and students to connect to their deepest being to create a life lived on purpose, and with joy!

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